History

1995 – MSPCA law-enforcement officer of 26 years Bill Phinney passes away after a courageous battle against AIDS.

1996 – MSPCA launches Phinney’s Friends program to help people in the Boston area living with HIV and AIDS keep their pets.

2007 – Phinney’s Friends program expands its help to elderly people in the Boston area.

2009 – MSPCA shuts down Phinney’s Friends program. A group of volunteers founds Phinney’s Friends, Inc. The independent nonprofit inherits all former Phinney’s/MSPCA clients and starts serving them with ongoing pet care and financial assistance for pet-related expenses. It also decides to expand its scope to helping anyone low-income in the Boston area (Route I-95 belt) keep their pets, no matter what hardship they are going through — be it any illness, loss of job or other crises.

2011 – Phinney’s Friends creates a pet pantry, and with it a network of donation bins located at businesses, powered by volunteers who transport, sort and distribute donated pet supplies to low-income families in need.

2012 – Phinney’s Friends expands its services by launching its Emergency Program, to help low-income people with one-time emergencies such as vet bills, temporary fostering and temporary in-home pet care. This program also expands Phinney’s Friends reach to the greater Boston area, covering families in the Route I-495 belt.

2013 – Phinney’s Friends launches its Pet Boost Program to support AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts members from the Boston facility with pet supplies. As not all needed products may be available at the pantry, Phinney’s Friends starts purchasing essential pet supplies as part of its activities to support pet-loving families in need.

2015 – Phinney’s Friends expands its coverage to statewide, offering its services to any low-income family residing in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

2016 – Phinney’s Friends expands its Pet Boost Program to not only help AIDS Action Committee of Massachusetts, but also help any eligible low-income family who need pet supplies and regular vet checks when they are going through a temporary financial hardship.